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War of 1812 Print Series

Fine quality reproductions of original war prints at affordable prices. You will not find these anywhere else on the internet. They make great educational tools! Limited quantities! - Wholesale Discounts available for museum and other gift shops and bookstores -

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Shipping Costs:

1 to 2 prints ........... 3.50US (5.00CAN)
3 to 16 prints.......... 4.50US (5.75CAN)

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Battle of the Thames, 5th October 1813

The original hand-coloured lithograph was printed some twenty years after the event, and compresses time and geography to show the key elements of the Battle of the Thames. The central figures show Richard M. Johnson, colonel of a corps of mounted Kentucky volunteers and in 1837 Vice-President of the United States, about to fire on an Indian chief, purportedly the great Tecumseh who was killed in the battle.

Image: 9"X11" Total Size with white border and description 12"X14" PNT-001 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)


The Action between His Majesty's Ship Shannon and the United States Frigate Chesapeake, off Boston Light House on the 1st of June 1813

This is a very dramatic aquatint the HMS Shannon unleashes a broadside the US Frigate Chesapeake, while in raking position. It was during this action the motto "Don't give up the ship" was uttered by the dying American Officer Lawrence.

Image: 9"X11.5" Total Size with white border and description 12"X14" PNT-002 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)


Battle of Queenston Heights, 5th October 1812

This view of the famous 1812 battle is based on a sketch by James Dennis, an officer of the 49th Regiment of Foot who took part in the battle, and shows the American forces crossing the Niagara River form Lewiston under fire from the hastily assembled Canadian militia and British regulars. The Battle of Queenston is remembered as the action where Major General Sir Isaac Brock fell.

Image: 9"X12" Total Size with white border and description 12"X14") PNT-003 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)


Attack on Fort Oswego, Lake Ontario, N. America, May 6th, 1814

Fort Oswego, an important American base at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, was captured on 6 May 1814 by a force of British regulars, marines and seamen, and Upper Canadian militia. This work is based on a drawing by Lieutenant John Hewett, a Royal Marines officer, who rushed the fort's flagstaff, climbed it under heavy fire and ripped down the American flag. All the ships are named in the bottom legent of this print along with the regiments landing on shore.

Image: 9.5"X11.5" Total Size with white border and description 12"X14") PNT-004 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)


A View of Fort George, Upper Canada, from Old Fort Niagara

This view of Fort George from the American side illustrates the "strategic checkmating" along the Niagara River during the War of 1812. Fort George, the military headquarters of Upper Canada, was built in 1796 to replace Fort Niagara, then in the United States. The fort was captured by an American force in May 1813 and largely destroyed in December of that year on their withdrawal.

Image: 7.5"X12" Total Size with white border and description 12"X14") PNT-005 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)


A View of the Lake & Fort Erie, from Buffalo Creek

Fort Erie was part of the chain of communications between Lakes Erie and Ontario. Seized by American forces in July 1814, Fort Erie was the centre of several engagements during that year. This view, in quieter times before the war, shows its important harbour.

Image: 9"X11.5" Total Size with white border and description 12"X14") PNT-006 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)


Series Two: 5 Large Fort Plans & 1 Watercolour
Own the whole series for 95.00US (99.50CAN)

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York Barracks, Lake Ontario, Upper Canada, Anno Domini 1804

Begun by Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe in 1793, Fort York provided needed protection to the little capital of Upper Canada then forming. During the American attacks of 27 April and 31 July 1813, the fort and government buildings were destroyed. Except for a few minor improvements, the defences at York in 1813 had remained unchanged from this earlier view.

Image: 11"X18" Total Size with white border and description 16"X20") PNT-007 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)

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A Plan of the Fort at Point Henry in its present state, May 1814

Overlooking the harbour and naval yard, Fort Henry was part of the expanded defence works built at Kingston during the War of 1812. Constructed of timber and earth faced with stone, the fort was demolished in 1832 to make way for the large stone citadel that stands today.

Image: 14"X 18" Total Size with white border and description 16"X20") PNT-008 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)

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Plan of the present state of Fort George, June 20th, 1814

Initially constructed in 1796 to replace Fort Niagara, Fort George was largely destroyed during operations in 1813. In 1814 efforts were undertaken to reconstruct the fortifications; nevertheless, the site was of diminishing importance and was finally abandoned in 1828. Now fully restored, its invaders are U.S. and Canadian tourists

Image: 14"X18" Total Size with white border and description 16"X20") PNT-009 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)

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Plans and Sections of the Works of Defence to be constructed at Amherstburg, Upper Canada 1799

The headquarters of the British Right Division during the War of 1812, Fort Amherstburg was little changed from this earlier plan. Destroyed by the retreating British and Canadian forces in September 1813, the site was then occupied by an American force until July 1815. Fort Malden was constructed on the ruins of the first fort, and is today a National Historic Site.

Image: 11"X18" Total Size with white border and description 16"X20") PNT-010 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)

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Sketch of Fort Niagara,in its presnt state, July 6th, 1814

One of the British forts relinquished to the United States in 1796, Fort Niagara was captured by British and Canadian forces in December 1813. Fort Niagara, with minor improvements, was retained for the balance of the war. With the signing of the Treaty of Ghent, the fort again reverted to the United States. Fort Niagara is today a New York State Historic Site operated under licence by the Old Fort Niagara Association.

Image: 13" X 18" Total Size with white border and description 16"X20") PNT-011 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)

IMAGE COMING SOON

Plan of the present state of the fort erecting at Point Mississauga, at the entrance of the Niagara River, 1814

Fort Mississauga was begun in the spring of 1814 as part of the increased defences at Niagara, although it was never more than an incomplete field work during the war. Its central tower was partially constructed from the brick remains of Niagara town buildings burned by the retreating Americans in December 1813. The tower is today an integral part of a golf course.

Image: 11"X18" Total Size with white border and description 16"X20") PNT-012 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)


Series Three: 3 Large Naval Plans & 1 River Battle Map
Own the whole series for 89.00US (95.00CAN)

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Plan of Sackets Harbor, c. 1815

Sacket's Harbor was the most important American naval yard on Lake Ontario. In May 1813 an unsuccessful attack was launched against the place in an attempt to destroy the shipbuilding facilities. This manuscipt plan shows the fortifications and ships in the harbour, and fom several references was probably prepared during a number of secret reconnaissances immediately after the war.

Image: 9.75"X17.5" Total Size with white border and description 16"X20") PNT-013 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)

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Plan of HM Frigate Princess Charlotte, 1813

Launched at Kingston in April 1814, the Princess Charlotte was a 44-gun frigate typical of the larger class of vessels constructed by both sides during the War of 1812. She took part in the attack on Fort Oswego in May 1814 and in the blockade of Sackets Harbor. Renamed Burlington, she was laid up after the war and was "supposed taken to pieces: in January 1833.

Image: 6.75"X18" Total Size with white border and description 16"X20") PNT-014 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)

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Ships' dimensions and draughts of a Royal Navy Schooner Frigate of 22 guns and of a Frigate of 32 guns, 1813.

To maintain British naval superiority on the Great Lakes, it was proposed to build ships in Canada from frames transported from England. The frigate Psyche was launched at Kingston in December 1814 from frames constructed in Britain and hauled up the St. Lawrence by bateaux. With their experience and knowledge, master shipbuilders would produce the vessels from simple lines and dimensions like those reproduced.

Image: 11"X18" Total Size with white border and description 16"X20" PNT-015 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)

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Two 1812 images on one print!

1. Part of the River Thames, Upper Canada, 9 August 1814

Following the loss of the naval squadron on Lake Erie in September 1813, the British Right Division was forced to retreat from Amherstburg up the Thames River. Caught by the pursuing American army nar the village of Moraviantown, the largest part of the British and Canadian force was captured in the ensuing battle and the Shawnee chief Tecumseh killed. This plan marks the general line of retreat and location of the American advance.

2. Sketch of part of the River Chateauguay, 1814

In the autumn of 1813 an American force of 4,000 troops advanced up the Chateauguay River as part of a two-pronged attack on Montreal. Met by a small force of Canadian Fencibles, Voltigeurs and militia under led by Lt. Col. Charles de Salaberry, the Americans were forced to withdraw, and Montreal was saved. This plan was prepared from a sketch by de Salaberry and shows the skillful positioning of the defending Canadian force.

2 images each measuring 6"X18" Total Size with white border and description 16"X20" PNT-016 Special Internet Price 24.50US (29.50CAN)


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